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Non-Consensual Treatment Is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible

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Non-Consensual Treatment Is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible

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The goal of my comments regarding the case study of Eve Hyde — presented in the introduction of this symposium — is not first and foremost to resolve the conflict between individual autonomy and medical paternalism regarding non-consensual psychiatric treatment. Instead, the goal is to step back far enough from what is generally accepted as the morally appropriate basis for non-consensual psychiatric treatment, including involuntary hospitalization and medication, and to ask very basic questions about when patients may permissibly be treated without their consent. My goal, in short, is Socratic — to explore aspects of what we take for granted in order better to determine whether we ought to take them for granted.

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Non-Consensual Treatment Is (Nearly Always) Morally Impermissible

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Author Mark J. Cherry
Number 4
Volume 38
Publication JLME
Journal Year 2010
 

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